Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Sydney

Sydney, the capital of New South Wales and one of Australia's largest cities, is best known for its harbourfront Sydney Opera House, with a distinctive sail-like design. Massive Darling Harbour and the smaller Circular Quay port are hubs of waterside life, with the arched Harbour Bridge and esteemed Royal Botanic Garden nearby. Sydney Tower’s outdoor platform, the Skywalk, offers 360-degree views of the city and suburbs. Sydney is one of the world’s most green, global and connected cities. As Australia’s leading global city and the gateway to Asia, Sydney is the destination of choice for international corporations, business leaders, tourists, and students. Sydney provides headquarters for almost 40% of the top 500 Australian corporations. Digital, financial, educational and creative businesses are all thriving in Sydney – supported by our robust economic strategy. Through the City of Sydney’s Sustainable Sydney 2030 program, Sydney is recognized internationally for its outstanding environmental performance and major cultural events, and as a future-focused and innovative business center. Sydney is also host to one of the largest Chinese New Year Festivals in the world.  

Edited By:Travalian Downloader Rahul Updated : 2019-10-01 Suggest an edit

Sydney, capital of New South Wales and one of Australia's largest cities, is best known for its harbourfront Sydney Opera House, with a distinctive sail-like design. Massive Darling Harbour and the smaller Circular Quay port are hubs of waterside life, with the arched Harbour Bridge and esteemed Royal Botanic Garden nearby. Sydney Tower’s outdoor platform, the Skywalk, offers 360-degree views of the city and suburbs. Sydney is one of the world’s most green, global and connected cities. As Australia’s leading global city and the gateway to Asia, Sydney is the destination of choice for international corporations, business leaders, tourists and students. Sydney provides headquarters for almost 40% of the top 500 Australian corporations. Digital, financial, educational and creative businesses are all thriving in Sydney – supported by our robust economic strategy. Through the City of Sydney’s Sustainable Sydney 2030 program, Sydney is recognised internationally for its outstanding environmental performance and major cultural events, and as a future focused and innovative business centre. Sydney is also host to one of the largest Chinese New Year Festivals in the world.  

Edited By:Travalian Downloader devi Updated : 2019-09-09 Suggest an edit

Before the invasion of the Europeans, the Aborigines comprised the sole inhabitants of this part of Australia. Today, the total Aborigines population approximately accounts for 2% of the total population. The total population of Sydney according to the 2012 census is 4.293 million. The arrival of the Europeans resulted in a diverse population existing in Sydney. Most of the inhabitants cite their ancestry back to the British, Scottish, Chinese or Irish. The people of Sydney are characteristically kind and gentle. Roman Catholics and Anglicans are the majority of religions followed in Sydney. Islam stands third in the religious groups and more than 18% of the population does not identify with any of the religious groups. The majority of the population in Sydney comes under the working class professionals.  

Edited By:Travalian Downloader devi Updated : 2019-09-09 Suggest an edit

Sydney has so many recommended food and restaurants worth tried by both locals and tourists. 1. Brewtown Newtown is definitely worth a visit for its cronuts. Not only are they uncommon in Asia, these cronuts that Brewton makes tastes heavenly! There’s a reason why everyone claims you must eat them when you’re in Sydney. Brewton is set in a 19th-century warehouse, with vegan and gluten-free options available. 2. Sydney Fish Market needs no introduction. A must-visit when you come to Sydney! Oysters are definitely a must-try food in Sydney. Bask in the atmosphere in the mornings! The market is home to well-known restaurants such as Deep Seafood Cafe and Oyster Bar and Fisherman’s Wharf. As with fresh seafood, they can be rather pricey. Well, but as one of the largest working fishing port and wholesale fish market, at least you know that these are quality seafood you’re getting! 3. Hurricane’s Grill Darling Harbour has over 300 Google reviews, 300 reviews on OpenTable. Enough said. Not to mention, the views overlooking the harbor can set the tone for a romantic night out, or an intimate family gathering. You should make a reservation if you can, or be prepared to wait up to 1.5 hours. Don’t blame them if their service is poor, with all those patrons, it can be hard to keep track. Even with all that waiting and less-than-stellar service, the ribs would still be worth your while. Perfectly grilled with flavourful marinade and tender on the inside, hundreds of others can vouch for its taste.  

Edited By:Travalian Downloader Rahul Updated : 2019-10-01 Suggest an edit

To its simple façade, Sydney has a rich culture and traditional backdrop. The people have great taste in music, art, dance, performing arts and as well as cuisine. The city is also home to any kind of festival, for instance, the Sydney Festival, Chinese New Year festival, and Musica Viva Festival. The clothing style of Sydneysiders is also trendy and fashionable. Australian cuisine is very delicious and while you are visiting Sydney. Steaks, coffee, fish and many such other foods are eaten on a regular basis. You can also experience in-house cafes to dine in with the locals or you can just visit the eat streets to indulge in the local taste of Sydney.  

Edited By:Travalian Downloader Rahul Updated : 2019-10-01 Suggest an edit

Sydney has become one of the most prominent cities of the modern world. Some evidence suggests that humans walked on the lands of Australia 50,000 years before the first European settlers arrived. In the late 1700s, a British Lord named Thomas Townshend, also known as Lord Sydney, decided to establish a penal colony on the east coast of Australia. The first fleet of 11 ships arrived on the coasts of Australia in 1788. Convicts that came with the ships brought with them diseases that spread rapidly and dissolved most of the native population. The second fleet of ships carrying more convicts arrived in 1790. The fleet which was to bring relief brought more misery with it, which in turn resulted in food shortage and starvation. Lack of farming also led to the clean sweep of the natives along with the convicts and their guards. Relief came in 1810 with the arrival of Lachlan Macquarie, who made the conditions in Sydney liveable and gradually strengthened the weak economy of Sydney. After his departure in 1810, the growth of Sydney remained intact and ever-growing. Despite many setbacks like the spread of Bubonic Plague, the Great Depression, and the two World Wars, the economy of Sydney was not hindered.  

Edited By:Travalian Downloader Rahul Updated : 2019-10-01 Suggest an edit

Markets in Sydney offer a broad range of goods, from fresh produce to vintage clothing. Weekend markets are held in many neighborhoods. Indulge in coffee and a bacon-and-egg roll or a spinach and mushroom gozleme before buying some beautiful flowers and freshly picked vegetables. The Rocks Markets in The Rocks, near the Sydney Opera House, is held on Saturdays and Sundays. More than 200 stalls sell arts, crafts, souvenirs, jewelry, leather goods, homewares, and prints. Freshly cooked food is available from stalls in Argyle Street on Fridays, from 9 am to 3 pm. One of Sydney’s inexpensive shopping destinations is Paddy’s Markets, near Chinatown. From Wednesday to Sunday, you can buy fruit and vegetables, spices, clothing, accessories and toys. Near Paddy’s Markets jump aboard the light rail for a short trip to Sydney Fish Market at Pyrmont. This is one of the biggest seafood markets in the world. You can join an early morning tour of the markets, including the wholesale fish auction. The market is open daily from 7am. On Saturdays, fashionistas should head for Paddington Markets on Oxford Street. If you’re at Bondi Beach on a Sunday, stroll to the Bondi Markets at the public school for a browse of the stalls. Take a bus at Town Hall to join the crowds at Rozelle Collectors Markets in Sydney’s inner west. Open on Saturdays and Sundays on the grounds of Rozelle Public School, Rozelle Collectors Markets have more than 100 stalls and are best known for second-hand and vintage wares.  

Edited By:Travalian Downloader Rahul Updated : 2019-10-01 Suggest an edit

Sydney's famous beaches are some of the city's most popular attractions for locals and visitors alike. Although they can get crowded on warm Aussie days, beaches like Coogee, Bondi and Manly cannot be missed. And if you'd rather take to the water, exploring Darling Harbour or Sydney Harbour by boat is a must. Sydney Harbour also offers prime views of some of the city's most famous landmarks, including Mrs. Macquarie's Chair, the Sydney Opera House and the Sydney Harbour Bridge. There are plenty of museums to explore, too, such as the Hyde Park Barracks Museum, the Art Gallery of New South Wales and the Australian National Maritime Museum, while the Royal Botanic Garden and The Rocks neighborhood are ideal for a leisurely stroll.  

Edited By:Travalian Downloader Rahul Updated : 2019-10-01 Suggest an edit

There are still a lot of interesting activities to do in the city such as : Go stargazing at Sydney Observatory There’s nothing quite as awe-inspiring as the night sky and, with a visit to the Sydney Observatory after dark, you’ll have the opportunity to learn about our incredible universe and gaze up at the star-filled heavens. For just under $30, you can join a night tour of the historic site, where you’ll see the Planetarium and dome, and have the opportunity to enjoy a telescope viewing (weather permitting). Great for a night out with the special person in your life, older kids or a few friends, you’ll find plenty of opportunities to talk to the astronomy educators and learn more about the astronomical objects on display. Sessions run daily from 8:30 pm. Night tours at the Sydney Observatory must be pre-booked, which can be done online or over the phone. Discover the Sydney Opera House When most people think of Sydney, it’s likely that the Sydney Opera House comes to mind, and for good reason – it’s one of the city’s world-renowned icons. While the Opera House offers some great photo opportunities during the day, there’s more to see and do around this spectacular building after dark. Throughout the year, the building hosts an incredible variety of live performances, from contemporary music and theatre through to comedy, ballet and classical music. Check out the current calendar of events and pick up tickets to a show that piques your interest, or, if you’re not in the mood for a show, head down to the edge of the harbor and enjoy a drink or bite to eat at Opera Bar. Nestled beneath the Opera House, the bar and restaurant offer some fantastic views of Circular Quay, the Sydney Harbour Bridge and beyond, and, of course, some great tipples. Get arty after dark If you happen to find yourself without something to do on a Wednesday night, two of Sydney’s biggest art galleries offer extended mid-week hours, allowing you to see more of their fantastic works on the show after dark. The Art Gallery of New South Wales, located next to the Royal Botanic Gardens, runs its Art After Hours program weekly, with a host of lectures, talks, and tours available until 10 pm, and its onsite restaurant operates until 9 pm. If modern art is more your thing, the Museum of Contemporary Art, overlooking Circular Quay, also leaves their doors open until 9 pm on Wednesdays, with their cafe and store remaining open too. Perfect for a mid-week adventure, you’ll have the opportunity to see incredible works from across Australia and the globe without the typical weekend crowds.  

Edited By:Travalian Downloader Rahul Updated : 2019-10-01 Suggest an edit

By Flight : Sydney houses the oldest commercial working airport in the world. The Sydney Kingsford Smith International Airport is the busiest airport. Around 35 airlines fly in and out of Sydney connecting it with the world. Sydney is well connected to the Asian-pacific countries like Hong Kong, Tokyo, Singapore, etc. The places in America that are connected to Sydney are Vancouver, Johannesburg, Los Angeles and much more. Flights from Sydney are well connected to the middle east as well. The domestic flight connectivity of Sydney is also extensive. It can be reached by Melbourne, Brisbane, Canberra, and many more places. Some containers flying to and fro Sydney are Jester, Tiger and Virgin Australia. Nearest Airport: Sydney Kingsford Smith International Airport is located 9 km south of the city center in Southern Sydney on the northern shores of Botany Bay. Safety Suggestion: The flights may be delayed due to unsuitable weather conditions. By Bus : Bus coaches are connected to Sydney via all the major cities. The bus connectivity is extensive and well-linked to the city center. The coaches are a preferred means of transport to reach Sydney because it is less time-consuming and cheaper. These coaches connect different places like Melbourne, Canberra, Brisbane to Sydney. Some Coach companies are Greyhound Coaches, Murray, Priors Scenic Express. Journey Suggestion: The road conditions are good and provide you with an easy commute. By Train : New South Wales Train link runs from Brisbane, Melbourne, Canberra, and other South-Wales regions. These long-distance commuter trains are cheap and less stressful while you have to make a long-distance journey.  

Edited By:Travalian Downloader Rahul Updated : 2019-10-01 Suggest an edit
Support Australia

Building a Better Community

Add

Ask View All
  • I'm thinking about moving to Sydney from Cairns, what is one of the better areas to live that are not to expensive, can anyone advise?
Reviews View All

No Reviews yet

Help this community with your review