Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia

Alice Springs

Alice Springs is the third-largest town in the Northern Territory of Australia. Popularly known as ""the Alice"" or simply ""Alice"", Alice Springs is situated roughly in Australia's geographic centre. The area is known as Mparntwe to its original inhabitants, the Arrernte, who have lived in the Central Australian desert in and around what is now Alice Springs for tens of thousands of years. The name Alice Springs was given by surveyor William Whitfield Mills after Alice, Lady Todd, wife of the telegraph pioneer Sir Charles Todd. Alice Springs had an urban population of almost 24,000 at the 2016 Census; it accounts for approximately 10% of the population of the Northern Territory.It is nearly equidistant from Adelaide and Darwin. The town straddles the usually dry Todd River on the northern side of the MacDonnell Ranges. The surrounding region is known as Central Australia, or the Red Centre, an arid environment consisting of several different deserts. Temperatures in Alice Springs can vary dramatically, with an average maximum in summer of 35.6 °C (96.1 °F) and an average minimum in winter of 5.1 °C (41.2 °F). Alice Springs has faced many recent problems, largely stemming from a strong racial divide that has existed in the town for years, and an increase in crime.  

Edited By:Travalian Downloader Rahul Updated : 2019-09-27 Suggest an edit

Alice Springs is the third-largest town in the Northern Territory of Australia. Popularly known as ""the Alice"" or simply ""Alice"", Alice Springs is situated roughly in Australia's geographic centre. The area is known as Mparntwe to its original inhabitants, the Arrernte, who have lived in the Central Australian desert in and around what is now Alice Springs for tens of thousands of years. The name Alice Springs was given by surveyor William Whitfield Mills after Alice, Lady Todd, wife of the telegraph pioneer Sir Charles Todd. Alice Springs had an urban population of almost 24,000 at the 2016 Census; it accounts for approximately 10% of the population of the Northern Territory.It is nearly equidistant from Adelaide and Darwin. The town straddles the usually dry Todd River on the northern side of the MacDonnell Ranges. The surrounding region is known as Central Australia, or the Red Centre, an arid environment consisting of several different deserts. Temperatures in Alice Springs can vary dramatically, with an average maximum in summer of 35.6 °C (96.1 °F) and an average minimum in winter of 5.1 °C (41.2 °F). Alice Springs has faced many recent problems, largely stemming from a strong racial divide that has existed in the town for years, and an increase in crime.  

Edited By:Travalian Downloader Rahul Updated : 2019-09-27 Suggest an edit

Add your description of the people living in Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia  

There are a fair few options here in Alice Springs for tucker. McDonald's, KFC, Hungry Jacks , and Red Rooster are the main take away chains, but there are also your small family take aways, such as Big Al's, East Side Fish and Chips and Scoff. Additionally, there are some great Pizza Shops in town, La Casalinga is a great feed. It's on Gregory Terrace, and it's got a really nice old school atmosphere about it. Has not changed for 20 years, and won't in the near future!  

Edited By:Travalian Downloader Rahul Updated : 2019-09-27 Suggest an edit

The Yeperenye story and many more ancient myths, symbols and images can be found in the rich diversity of local Aboriginal art. Alice Springs’ outstanding art galleries and cultural museums are the perfect way to interact with and learn more about the area’s incredible visual heritage. To set yourself up with an introduction to Aboriginal art, culture and history, a visit to the Araluen Cultural Precinct is a must. It’s home to a number of galleries and museums, and rich with important stories of the land and its people.  

Edited By:Travalian Downloader Rahul Updated : 2019-09-27 Suggest an edit

The history of Alice Springs began back in 1871 when it was originally named by a very important explorer that was making his third and final attempt through the centre of Australia to the north coast and mapping the terrain for white settlement to come through after him. After making his mark through the Australian countryside it was only fitting that the then built Stuart Highway be named after him in recognition. Once Stuart had mapped out the track to the north coast of Australia it was seen to that the Overland Telegraph Line that runs from Adelaide through to Darwin be constructed which was complete come the year 1872 which made it much easier for anyone who wished take up leases in the far north parts of the country. But it wasn’t until 1887 that the big boom came for Alice Springs when gold was finally discovers in these parts which saw hundreds of settlers flock to the region to claim the stakes.  

Edited By:Travalian Downloader Rahul Updated : 2019-09-27 Suggest an edit

Shopping in Alice Springs is easy because most shops are located in the town’s Central Business District: the Yeperenye Shopping Centre, Alice Plaza and Todd Mall. The best thing about shopping in Alice Springs is that everything is within easy walking distance – you won’t get lost shopping in town! The main tourist, souvenir and Aboriginal art shops are located in Todd Mall, which is the official main street of Alice Springs. There’s also some great cafes and restaurants in Todd Mall. Walk to the middle of Todd Mall, and you’ll find the Tourist Information Centre. To us locals, however, Todd Mall is mainly for tourists and eating out. If you want to get the ‘real’ feel of shopping in Alice Springs, you need to leave very touristy, expensive Todd Mall. Alice Springs has two shopping malls in the CBD: Yeperenye Shopping Centre and Alice Plaza. There are also a number of arcades and smaller malls: Coles Complex, Leichtodd Plaza and Reg Harris Lane.  

Edited By:Travalian Downloader Rahul Updated : 2019-09-27 Suggest an edit

Pyndan Camel Tracks – Take a one-hour or half day journey aboard a ""ship of the desert"", through the scenic Ilparpa Valley, located in the famous MacDonnell Ranges. Owner and cameleer Marcus has been working with camels since 1982 and his camels are well trained. Pyndan Camel Tracks is the only camel-riding experience based out of Alice Springs, and he also offers a free shuttle service from most hotels and the Alice Springs Visitor Information Centre to help people get to his property. Outback Ballooning - Take a balloon ride and see the sunrise. Alice Springs has ideal weather for ballooning and the tour operators run almost every day of the year. Quads & Motorcycles - Some tour groups do quadding through the spinifex, and Harley rides through remote Central Australia - lovely day trips. Cycle hire - You can hire a bicycle and tour around town the healthy way. Just remember your water! Golf Course - For the incurable golfer, the golf course is rated one of the best desert golf courses. There are a lot of golfers here so it must be good. There's also a clubhouse with drinks & snacks.  

Edited By:Travalian Downloader Rahul Updated : 2019-09-27 Suggest an edit

Alice Springs, like most of the Northern Territory, has tough liquor laws. It is illegal to drink in Public places (Parks, Streets, etc). The Telegraph Station to the North of the town permits drinking and a lot of families go there for a BBQ and a relax. Regardless of how sorry you may feel, don't purchase alcohol on behalf of people you don't know - if they can't buy it themselves, then there's a reason for that.  

Edited By:Travalian Downloader Rahul Updated : 2019-09-27 Suggest an edit

By plane: There is an airport in Alice Springs. The airport doesn't have air bridges, so that passengers need to use stairs to get in/out of planes. However the walk to the terminal is less than a minute. The terminal is large and efficient, but the ticket counters do close in the afternoon for about two hours. Currently Qantas has connecting flights to Darwin, Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Adelaide, Cairns and Perth. Virgin Australia has direct flights a few times a week to Darwin and Adelaide. There is a flying shuttle to Uluru also (but Uluru has an airport (AYQ) too, so if you're just flying in to see the rock, you don't have to stop off at Alice). Both have car rental outlets in the terminal. Watch out for the flies when leaving the airport, head netting is worth considering on the way to your rental car. By train: The Ghan is a private tourist train covering the vast distance from Adelaide to Darwin stopping in Alice. Expect to pay a premium over the airfare, even for a sitting seat. You can put your car on the train. By car: Alice Springs is 17 hours drive from Darwin, and 18 hours drive from Adelaide. The Stuart Highway from Adelaide is well-maintained and goes right through Coober Pedy, an underground town famous also for being the opal capital of the world (and therefore well worth stopping off for a visit on the way). It continues through Tennant Creek and Katherine all the way up to Darwin. If you are driving on the main sealed routes from other Australian Capital cities, you will likely not be driving on remote roads, and provided you do not take side trips, there will likely be passing traffic. It is worthwhile reading the safety tips for Driving in Australia and always carrying water and ensuring you know the location and opening hours of your fuel and food stops. Read the rental car conditions carefully. Rental cars in Alice Springs may not offer unlimited free kilometres. Rental cars hired outside of the Northern Territory may not be able to be driven into it. Driving after dark outside of the city limits may be prohibited. Rental companies in AC do not offer hand-controls for the handicapped. If the vehicle is damaged, get an independent assessment before returning the vehicle to the rental company. The official visitor information centre has access to unlimited kilometre rates, so it's worth getting in touch with them if you are going to clock up the Kms on the car! Do the math however, it doesn't always work out cheaper since the km inclusive rates seem to have a higher daily rate. By bus: Greyhound ply the route to Alice Springs from the north and the south.  

Edited By:Travalian Downloader Rahul Updated : 2019-09-27 Suggest an edit
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