Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

Adelaide

Adelaide is South Australia’s cosmopolitan coastal capital. Its ring of parkland on the River Torrens is home to renowned museums such as the Art Gallery of South Australia, displaying expansive collections including noted Indigenous art, and the South Australian Museum, devoted to natural history. The city's Adelaide Festival is an annual international arts gathering with spin-offs including fringe and film events.  

Edited By:Travalian Downloader Rahul Updated : 2019-09-26 Suggest an edit

Adelaide is South Australia’s cosmopolitan coastal capital. Its ring of parkland on the River Torrens is home to renowned museums such as the Art Gallery of South Australia, displaying expansive collections including noted Indigenous art, and the South Australian Museum, devoted to natural history. The city's Adelaide Festival is an annual international arts gathering with spin-offs including fringe and film events.  

Edited By:Travalian Downloader Rahul Updated : 2019-09-26 Suggest an edit

Add your description of the people living in Adelaide, South Australia, Australia  

Adelaideans are a loyal bunch, win their heart and they’ll stick with you – whether it’s towards their friends, sporting teams, or their food. Whilst Adelaide is more famous for the brilliant wines that hail from its Barossa and McLaren Vale regions, they’re equally passionate about their foods. Try these Adelaide foods that have reached legendary status. Pie Floater AB Fruchocs  

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Adelaide has an internationally recognised reputation for a thriving creative and cultural sector. Council is committed to working with the community to build on our City’s many strengths to ensure Adelaide is a welcoming and dynamic city full of rich and diverse experiences. Culture is fundamental to this vision. Culture is how we express who we are, as individuals, as members of a group and as a community. Culture is the very essence of our city, it is what we value and celebrate, and what makes us unique. A thriving creative cultural city is an essential driver of social and economic development.  

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Early Adelaide Before Europeans arrived the Kaurna tribe lived in the Adelaide area. The Indigenous Australians called the Adelaide area Tandanya, which means the Place of the Red Kangaroo. However in the early 1830s the British drew up plans to settle the area. It was planned the new colony in South Australia would be of free people not convicts. Surveyor-general William Light selected the site for the capital of the new colony in December 1836. Adelaide was a planned city and it was named after the wife of King George IV. The first governor of the new colony was Captain John Hindmarsh who landed on 28 December 1838. At first the settlers were British or Irish but in the mid-19th century many Germans settled in Adelaide and the surrounding area. Meanwhile in 1840 Adelaide was incorporated (given a corporation). It was the first city in Australia to be incorporated. The first mayor of Adelaide was James Hurtle Fisher. Also in 1840 The Royal Adelaide Hospital was founded. In 1840 Adelaide had a population of over 2,000. By 1850 Adelaide had a population of over 14,000. In 1900 Adelaide had a population of 162,000. Many famous buildings were erected in Adelaide in the 19th century. The foundation stone of Holy Trinity Church was laid in 1838. Old Adelaide Gaol was built in 1841. (It was decommissioned in 1988). Government House was completed in 1855 and St Francis Xavier Cathedral was dedicated in 1858. Ayers House was built in 1846. From 1855 to 1897 it was the home of Henry Ayers. Meanwhile Adelaide Town Hall was built in 1866. Adelaide General Post Office was built in 1867-72. It opened on 6 May 1872. (However Adelaide Post Office did not get its clock until 1875). Then in the year 1878 St Peter's Cathedral was consecrated. Edmund Wright House was also built in 1878. Modern Adelaide In 1900 Adelaide the population of Adelaide was 162,000 and it was growing rapidly. As Adelaide expanded more buildings were added. Parliament House in Adelaide was built in two parts. The West Wing was built in 1889 and the East Wing was built in 1939. In 1904 a statue of the explorer John McDouall Stuart was erected in Adelaide. In 1906 a statue of William Light was unveiled. Meanwhile amenities in Adelaide improved. The Botanic Gardens opened in 1857. Adelaide gained a gas supply in 1863 and an electricity supply in 1900. Meanwhile Adelaide Oval was established in 1871. Adelaide University was founded in 1874. The Art Gallery of South Australia was established in 1881. Adelaide airport dates from 1921. The War Memorial in Adelaide was built in 1931. Flinders University opened in 1966. Rundle Mall Shopping Centre opened in 1976. Adelaide Festival Centre was completed in 1980. Adelaide Convention Centre opened in 1987. Tandanya Cultural Institute opened in 1989. Adelaide is also known for the South Australian Museum and the Migration Museum, which opened in 1986. The South Australia Maritime Museum also opened in 1986. Today Adelaide is a thriving city. Today the population of Adelaide is about 1.3 million  

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In the city and surrounding suburbs you’ll find artisan markets, a wonderland of unique boutiques, sprawling shopping malls and gorgeous heritage arcades. Rundle Mall is our first port of call. With over 700 retailers in one convenient pedestrian-friendly strip, it’s Adelaide’s busiest, most popular shopping destination. Discover boutiques selling local designs and higher-end clothing stores on Rundle Street, one-off, luxe homewares on King William Road, the sprawling Central Market in Adelaide's CBD, design and produce markets in Adelaide's suburbs and major shopping outlets at Burnside and Glenelg.  

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Wondering what to do in Adelaide? The city is bursting with culture, flavours, events and entertainment. Soak-up the sun at one of many picture-perfect metropolitan beaches, visit chic inner-city boutiques for a hefty dose of retail therapy, dine at world-famous restaurants, sip your way through a thriving small bar scene or taste your way through some of Australia’s best wine regions. We keep the party going all year-round.  

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THERE’S PLENTY TO SEE AND DO DURING THE DAYLIGHT HOURS, BUT JUST WAIT TILL THE SUN GOES DOWN. THAT'S WHEN ADELAIDE COMES OUT TO PLAY. Here are some activities you can do in Adelaide at night : CLIMB, CHEERS AND CHEER AT ADELAIDE OVAL GO GLOBE-TROTTING ON GOUGER ST TEST THE ATMOSPHERICS AT THE ADELAIDE NIGHT MARKET  

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BY CAR From Melbourne drive to Adelaide in just under eight hours, or take the scenic route along the Great Ocean Road into South Australia. From Sydney, a trip is about 14 hours drive time. BY AIR FROM WITHIN AUSTRALIA Adelaide is easily accessible from all Australian airports by all major domestic airlines. Flight times from: Melbourne is less than one hour Sydney is just one hour and 10 minutes Brisbane is just one hour and forty five minutes View our airlines access page for routes, arilines and more information. BY AIR FROM OVERSEAS Adelaide is serviced by the world's best international airlines including Qatar Airways, Singapore Airlines, Malaysia Airlines, China Southern Airlines, Emirates, Cathay Pacific, Air New Zealand, Jetstar International and Fiji Airways. BY RAIL Great Southern Rail offers three interstate travel options to Adelaide: The Overland from Melbourne; The Ghan between Adelaide, Alice Springs and Darwin and The Indian Pacific which runs between Perth, Adelaide and Sydney. BY BUS Travel by coach from Melbourne to Adelaide with Firefly Express. BY SHIP International and domestic cruises berth in South Australia on a range of vessels, from smaller boutique ships to mega-liners. There are two berths; one at Port Adelaide-Outer Harbor and the other on the Eyre Peninsula at Port Lincoln. There are also two anchorages, one at Penneshaw on Kangaroo Island and the other at Robe on the Limestone Coast.  

Edited By:Travalian Downloader Rahul Updated : 2019-09-26 Suggest an edit
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